Arsenal News
Arsenal News & Transfers
As featured on NewsNow: Arsenal newsArsenal News 24/7

Arsenal News, Only Arsenal, Blogs, Transfer News

Archives

August 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Ten things we learned at Barnet

1. Out of position. Around half the team in the first half were playing off the position you’d normally find them in. Djourou at right back, Silvestre at left, Arshavin up front… All part of the fun presumably – but I wonder exactly why.

2. Rosicky – captain, smiling, and certainly not pulling out of any crunch tackles, wonderful flicks, powerful runs, full of speed. I’ve been wondering for a long time if the Arshavin-Rosicky thing can work, and this says yes. Of course I’d also like Van Persie and Eduardo in the same line up, but this will do for a starters. He looked so happy, and that was good news. We were happy too.

3. Luke Ayling. 7 years at Arsenal, and it shows. He put on an absolutely brilliant second half performance without a foot wrong. Our new central defender for sure. It is hard to believe how these young players can have the confidence and maturity that they have so early on. Forwards are easier to understand, because you attempt everything you can, and if one goes in you’re a hero. At the back everything has to work, and for Luke Ayling it did.

4. Coquelin was the surprise of last summer – and the year has given him strength and maturity, an eye for the ball, a style that is removing some of the edges of that strange shuffle he used to have and which now makes him a commanding central defensive midfielder. He’ll be a key to the Diddly Cup team, and might, just might, make it through this year if there are our normal crop of multiple injuries. But if we finally shake ourselves free of the disasters, one more year and he will be getting his place on the bench and pushing for games in the first team. He’s not like Denilson in style, but he is in the sense that if you look at him, you can’t believe it’s going to work.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING SECTION MAKES NO SENSE AT ALL. TO FIND OUT WHO I MEANT PLEASE SEE THE CORRESPONDENCE. SORRY

5. Lambert – oh what a talent, oh what a waste. Whenever I have seen him he seems to be full of brilliant football and a snarling temperament that makes me think, “will someone just get a decent psychologist to this kid, and sort him out.” We’ve seen him do some wretched tackles in the past, and be sent off. This time he lashed out an arm at a tackle he didn’t like, swore and snarled while others were just getting the hang of the game. Wenger put him on for the first half – which says – up and coming for the first team. But unless he can sort himself out, he won’t make it through a single game.

6. Barazite – looking sharp, scored a wonder goal – having had the odd venture into the first team squad he must now be at the core of the Diddly Cup squad, and looking for a place on the bench. (We are going to need a bigger bench.

7. Vermaelen – terrific first display, calm and organised, he was given the role of playing the whole game (the only one who had to), and keeping the kids together for the second half. Did that as well as he played the first half. Looks to be as good as everyone said he would be.

8. Mad Maria and her photographer chums.
Three ladies sitting just to the right of me in the main stand, all clicking away endlessly with their big lenses, interspersed by Maria’s single woman chanting of “we are the Arsenal girls” and the awful “You what you what you what” when Sanchez Watt got the ball. Her chums sat in their headscarves, peaceful as peaceful could be – it is a strange combination. The guy next to me – a charming gent, season ticket holder at Barnet for years – told me that on occasion the sound man has asked Maria to shut up at Arsenal reserve games, because she’s overloading the recording devises. (Incidentally on chanting, there was a new Adebayor chant which ends “and show him the door”. What was the line before that?

9. The Mad Underground. Maybe this had to be the time for closing half of the Barnet Underground car park, which is used by fans for Barnet games. But if it had to be, maybe there should have been

a) A notice to say when it was full
b) A patrol to stop people parking cars in such a way that it made it virtually impossible for anyone to drive in or out
c) A consideration of how, when people had parked, they might actually be able to walk out of the car park without being run over.

It’s a tiny point (unless you are run over) – but it is just gross administrative incompetence. All it needed was one guy on duty – just like they have at Cockfosters for example – to say, right that’s it, it’s full. We arrived at 1.30 and it was full by then, and it took us half an hour to get the car back out of the car park to go and look for somewhere else. Meanwhile a queue of cars built up trying to get in – not realising it was full.

10. Ground safety. I’ve left this to last, because it just seems irrelevant to so many people, but somehow for me, being safe in these environments is vital. Maybe I remember the crushes of the old days too well.

Barnet closed the exit at the north west of the ground at the end of the game, so those who entered that way, could not get back out. But they didn’t tell us, and so there were people pushing both ways – some trying to get to the exit, others coming back realising it was shut. Stewards mingled, and did nothing to resolve the situation. In the end we were funnelled back past the area that players move across to get from the tunnel to the pitch. About 30 youngsters stood there, hoping to get autographs, and so effectively blocking the exit.

Of course everyone was calm and peaceful, and we all waited patiently to squeeze through one at a time. But it would have only taken one event to spark off the pushing, and from there we had no way out – we were straight up against a mesh barrier.

When will clubs learn that you have to think, you have to give out information, and above all you have to say to stewards, your job is not to stand around in groups nattering to each other on walky-talkies. I’ll be on the phone to the appropriate authorities tomorrow – for no reason other than the fact that by doing so I might actually save a few serious injuries at some time in the future.

Barnet – nice little club – very friendly. But you cannot behave like this.

(c) Tony Attwood. If replying to the this, and you haven’t written in before, please write Ref Barnet at the start, so I can see it is not a cut and paste job from elsewhere.

17 comments to Ten things we learned at Barnet

  • mason

    Love that Barazite goal. The way he wriggles in the crowded opposition box and his hair… it reminds me of Zlatan Ibrahimovic or Dimitar Berbatov

  • Sherif

    i think, there should be some more new signings…the way our rivals are getting ready for the fight this eason, we may be out of ammo.

  • es

    Lambert? Randall?? Post-modernist Cockney rhyming slang.

  • stuartlondon

    A very enjoyable day out. Like football used to be, the good bits and not so good.

    Arshavin, my personal favourite because of his committed attitude as well as his abilities, looked knackered after 30 minutes, but he always does. I thought his goal was a really high quality striker’s shot from a long cross into the box.

    Thought Vermaelen was quietly impressive. Able to put himself between offensive players and the ball, closing down attacking play without risking a yellow card.

    Everyone else looked really good to my untutored eye. Strength in depth or what? Didn’t think about Adewhatsit once. Sang ‘My garden shed is bigger than this’ I’m afraid. Sorry Tony.

  • Will

    who’s lambert? I’m pretty sure there wasn’t anyone called lambert in the squad. Randall put in some bad tackles, do you perhaps mean him?

  • JohnW

    Yes, there was not Lambert. I’m pretty certain he meant Mark Randall, and he has talent. Only he has to show he loves it enough, that’s when he will break into the first team.

  • Armin Medic

    whole game I was only fallowing Rosicky, to be honest, I was really scared of “Dudu syndrome”. You know I was scared of him exploding, scoring, and than being on news as “injured” again. So I don’t know,maybe it would be better if Le Boss let him play whole game with Vermalen.
    But on TV it looked really great, he is “same old” (almost) but its matter of routine, he didn’t play whole year, so few more games and he ll be perfect again.

    But, and its one big BUT, how can it happen, we play with 4 CBs (Djurou, Gallas, Vermalen, Sylvestre) in back line, so actually 4 players whose primal task is to clear high balls from box and we allowed such cheap goal as first equalizer was. Please don’t get me wrong, I am really optimistic toward next season, but seeing us again exposed to such goals, and again in closing minutes really upset me.
    Second one didn’t upset me because its just lack of attitude everyone have in friendly games.

  • Yes sorry about the Lambert Randall thing. We got back to the Midlands at about 7 and went to a party, and it was quite a good party….

    Dohhhhhhh

  • Pete the First

    Barazite does look like the old Robert Pires, hopefully he can transform himself into a modern version.

    Was that Gallas in early season form letting the Barnet forward out jump him? Hmmm thought so.

  • steww

    Thanks for the write up Tony. Every fan should write and complain every time this kind of stewarding fiasco happens. The lessons of the past must be learned.
    The result and the way we conceded isn’t important to me. This was a glorified training session. All that mattered was seeing TR7 back.

  • Adam Smith

    Indeed,just a training session.However watching Tomas in the flesh for what had seemed an eternity was worth the trip in itself.

  • steww

    Just watching the Stoke replay on ATV – stunning through ball from Denilson from inside his own half to put Diaby through. God he’s a great player.

  • steww

    Sorry that was apropos nothing at all, but it was a hell of a pass!

  • zebidiah

    Ref Barnet.

    Is Lambert an imaginary footballer like the one that you constantly bleat on about in The Times ,or can mistakes happen?

  • Paul

    Just watched the re-run of the match last night. Good to see Rosicky back. Barazite, really hope he can make it through. What it highlit for me is the very unenviable position the boss must have figuring out which youth to blood into the first team while people are howling for established players. As with Gibbs, the only way their talent can really be raised to the next level is with a run in the first team. Without this the Barazite, Wilshere, Simpson, and the defender, I forget his name, might never get a shot at it. Thank God we have the lord Wenger who actually has a bit of leeway as to who he lines up or we’d end up with a lot of wasted talent.

  • Paul

    People, as usual, hoping for us to slip up to our sugar daddied counterparts: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/article-1200749/Martin-Samuel-Adebayor-pain-selling-hurt-Wenger-more.html?ITO=1490

    As it is with every season, it’s us against the world. I’m loving it! Bring on the new season!

  • Adam Smith

    Paul,

    I would go further.The tabloids are willing for us to fail,even more so than in recent years.Hindsight is a wonderful thing,but predicting the future for this coming season is an entirely different matter..We like Manchester United have one thing in common,stability in Management,though remarkably our net spend under Arsene up to May 2008 was under 4 million.If Wenger is right,that the recession will ultimately take its toll on football,we are taking the right course,and injuries permitting,we have a stronger squad than last year.Maybe the days of the lone front striker are over,and perhaps the money achieved from the sale of Adebayor will partly be used to strengthen the defence with experience.
    Finally, it was interesting to read Wenger being quoted,that Adebayor wanted to leave last summer,which contradicts the belief that the crowd was on his back last season, and that may have effected his game.Personally,I find that hard to believe.